“Silky” Zucchini

Do you listen to podcasts? Any favorite food ones? For over a decade now I have been listening to 2 in particular. The first is “Good Food” from KCRW in Santa Monica. I could weep listening to the Santa Monica Farmers Market report on a weekly basis, especially in the dark months of winter here in New England.

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The second is “Splendid Table” from National Public Media and features as a host a woman by the name of Lynne Rosetto Kasper. I love how she brings food to life and has such a passion for all things cultural and culinary. Recently, Lynne spoke with the acclaimed chef Skye Gyngell and got this recipe for slow cooked zucchini. (As an aside, I have to state that the name Skye Gyngell is second only to Fuchsia Dunlop as a great name in female culinary talent and is also eligible to be a Bond Girl name…you know like Moneypenney or Eleanor Lavish from “Room with a View” or Vertamae Smart-Grosvenor.)

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Anyway, I digress. Skye talked about this method of cooking zucchini as slow and caring. No hot grill or pointy kebab stick.  And it’s ridiculously simple. The twist belongs to whatever fresh herb is added at the end. Start with 2 Tbsp each of olive oil and butter in a heavy pan on medium heat.

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Slice 12 small zucchini ( I used 2 medium/large) into 1/8″ coins. Put slices of zucchini in the pan with the melted butter and olive oil and toss gently to coat. Add two finely diced cloves of garlic. Turn the heat down to the lowest setting of the burner. Skye’s recipe, made on a commercial burner allegedly takes 40 minutes to soften and turn to it’s luxurious state. On my household burner, the time was closer to 1:10 hours. The key again is to stir it every ten minutes or so to prevent it from burning even the tiniest bit!

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Once the zucchini is cooked to soft and transparent state, take a good five or six stems of fresh tarragon ( although mint or basil or chervil will work also) and strip the stems and finely chop the leaves. Add about 3/4 of a tbsp of ground black pepper and about a teaspoon of kosher salt. Taste and adjust if needed.

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I will warn you that this is not a “pretty” vegetable side. But it more than makes up for it in taste. If you like the 5th taste of umami, then this is a dish for you. I suppose you could put it in a slow cooker, but still think you would have to check it for burning, although maybe not as frequently if your slow cooker was on low. I suggest using as a plain side dish, a topping for lightly tossed spinach, mixed with some lentils, or on a pasta with grated cheese…that would be yummy!


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